Midnight Madness last evening was everything it was hyped to be — and more!

Yes, the band was awesome, the cheerleaders had an amazing routine, the games were hilarious, and the women’s and men’s basketball teams put on quite a show after being introduced to a raucous Rowdies crowd at the Rhodes.

Topping it off, however, was junior David Brooker’s half-court shot at the end to win half tuition and a pizza. To say the crowd went wild is putting it mildly.

David Brooker's shot is up ...

David Brooker’s shot is up …

... and in!

… and in!

Basketball player Jacob Gibson’s tweet summed it up: “Thanks to EVERY GOLD-BLOODED BISON that came to Midnight Madness. Y’all are the best in D2. Nov. 14 first game. Let’s get rowdyyy!!!”

Tom Buterbaugh, editor/designer

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Without fanfare the diesel engines cranked up and earth-moving equipment made their presence known on the East side of campus last week. Thus began Phase III of Legacy Park. Phase III is needed to house the ever-increasing undergraduate enrollment at Harding.

Legacy Phase III

The construction project will add eight buildings to Legacy Park with 36 apartments for student housing. The structures will be similar to buildings constructed in Phase I. There will be six one-bedroom, 27 two-bedroom and three three-bedroom apartments. Phase III will provide housing for a maximum of 132 students.

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The new apartments will be completed by July 2015 at a cost of approximately $6.5 million.

David Crouch, director of public relations

Fall 14 coverThe attention-grabbing shot of Machu Picchu by Ashel Parsons (’13) on the cover is only a taste of what lies within the fall edition of Harding magazine, which will be arriving in mailboxes in the next few days.

The photo is part of our pictorial “Exploring Peru,” a six-page photo feature of Harding University Latin America’s trip to Peru. President Bruce McLarty and his wife, Ann, joined the group, and he shares memories of the trip in his column on the inside front cover. More of Parson’s photos are included in the online edition.

Peru isn’t our only destination as we go with the engineering and physics department to Haiti as they integrate engineering thinking and problem solving by partnering with the people of Peltan. Additional photos are included online.

Also in this issue, tribute is paid to former Dean of Nursing Cathleen Shultz who completed 37 years building Carr College of Nursing while serving as a leader among nurse educators, including serving as president of the National League for Nursing. Tributes from her celebratory dinner are included on the pages as well as online.

Other stories include the 2014 alumni awards, profiles on Lions Club executive administrator Scott Drumheller (’91) and La-Z-Boy designer Sara Guglielmo Sweeney (’09), and how you know you went to Harding in the End Note.

What do you think of the new issue? Email hardingmag@harding.edu and let us know.

Tom Buterbaugh, editor/designer

Last night concluded Harding’s 91st annual Lectureship with keynote speaker B. Chris Simpson on the topic “Return to Joy.” As a student, I had the opportunity to hear Simpson speak in chapel, and it was great to hear him speak again, as well as share in the enthusiasm he always brings to the Benson. It was a profound message and challenge to end this year’s theme of “Return.”

Lectureship meant a lot to me as a student, and maybe in part because we were occasionally excused from class to attend, but also because of the opportunity for growth the week always held. I was able to listen to those with more experience and knowledge than me, as well as see some of my fellow classmates and friends discuss their own experiences.

As I’m no longer an undergraduate student, Lectureship no longer means an excuse from class and a break in the routine, but it still means looking forward to a week of spiritual growth and encouragement. After looking through shared content on #HULectureship, it’s great to see that so many others who come to Lectureship feel the same way I do.

Presented through a week of speakers, discussions, concerts and performances, spiritual growth happens at Lectureship.

To sum it up, Lectureship means:

  • A family reunion on a whole new level.
  • Renewing my purpose as a Christian.
  • An encouraging time to worship with others. 
  • Acknowledging that this path won’t always be easy, but that’s OK.

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The first official day of fall has arrived, and the Harding community is getting a peek into the joys that autumn brings: cooler temperatures, knitted scarves and pumpkin-flavored everything. It is four years ago this month that I departed for my semester abroad and spent fall in the rolling hills of Tuscany.

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I always think of that semester in Florence, Italy, when this season of the year begins. The memories of cool evenings around the villa overlooking the city and afternoons spent in the middle of grape and olive harvests are fresh on my mind.

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Traveling abroad was an unforgettable experience, and it is an experience that almost half of Harding’s undergraduate students have in common. The University’s first study abroad program was created in 1980 in Florence under then president Clifton L. Ganus Jr. Since then, Harding has added six additional programs throughout the world, giving students opportunities to experience Africa, Australia, Asia, Europe and Latin America.

Today is the first day of fall, and today I am grateful for my experiences studying abroad and stretching the scope of my worldview. I’m thankful for my season in Italy, and I’m so excited for the many students who departed throughout September for their own international journeys. This semester, we have students studying in Australasia, England, Italy, Greece and Zambia. They will come back changed, and they will remember this fall forever.

Hannah Beall Owens, director of news services

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This time last year, students, faculty and staff across campus were putting last minute details on an historic event at Harding University. One year ago on Saturday, Harding’s fifth president was officially inaugurated into office.

Both the Benson Auditorium and the cafeteria were transformed into vibrant celebration spots in honor of Dr. Bruce McLarty. Banners were hung, exquisite food was prepared, and people came from all over to participate in this unique piece of Harding’s history. It was a party, and it was so much fun.

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One year later, I am looking back on the photos from that day. A number of guests were on campus to bring greetings and congratulate President McLarty and the University on this new season in its timeline. The University’s choruses combined to performed songs honoring faith, work and family, and country. Dr. McLarty presented his inaugural address and introduced the idea of “A Community of Mission.”

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My favorite part of planning for inauguration was the historical research I was privileged to perform. For various publications and printed projects, I dove into Harding’s past and the events that led us to where we are today. I saw the influence of past presidents and how Harding held firm to the Christian principles and values on which it was first established as the elements of the world surrounded it. I began to feel more pride in the institution I represent, and it made me excited for Harding’s future and this huge transition taking place.

“And while the future is beyond our sight, we can speak with a calm and settled confidence about our identity and our solid commitments as we move forward. So, in this place and on this occasion, we reaffirm Harding University as ‘A Community of Mission.’ This is what we have been, what we are today, and what we resolve to become. May God continue to richly bless Harding University.”
–President McLarty’s inaugural address, Sept. 20, 2013

Hannah Beall Owens, director of news services
Photos by Jeff Montgomery, director of photographic services

Never forget

Firefighters raising US Flag

Thirteen years ago I was sitting on the fourth floor of the New Headquarters building of the Central Intelligence Agency in McLean, Virginia. I was the graphic designer for the National Counterintelligence Executive, and I had been at work for about an hour. The day was clear and bright and felt like any other day. Around 9 a.m., a friend stopped by my cubicle and told me to go online to watch coverage of a plane striking the World Trade Center in New York City. I switched it on and immediately saw very tiny video of a plane flying into one of the gigantic skyscrapers. At first, because of the size of those buildings, I thought it was just a small plane that had probably lost control, but then upon seeing more of the coverage and the scale of the towers, I realized the plane that struck it was a passenger jet.

We all gathered around a TV in the front office with the director as smoke was billowing out of the tower. A few minutes later we watched as a second plane speared into the second tower dissolving into fire and smoke. We were speechless. I was surrounded by highly trained and experienced FBI, CIA and military intelligence agents who had seen what they had thought was the worst that humanity could accomplish, and they were speechless.

The executive officers in my office started scrambling making phone calls and making necessary contacts. The majority of us could not leave the TV so that we could see the coverage and try to understand how something like this could happen. We continued watching as coverage in New York suddenly switched to some pixelated coverage of a plane striking the side of the Pentagon. America was under attack. Others ran to their phones to call friends and family who were at work in that very building. Phone lines were down or so flooded that it was hard to get a phone call out. A few minutes later the loudspeaker system crackled with life: “EVACUATE THE BUILDING IMMEDIATELY!”

My director, an FBI agent with decades of experience, came running out of this office and told us, “Get the [expletive] out! Another plane has gone missing, and it could be headed this direction.”

Everyone dropped everything and did our information evacuation protocols and then hurried to our vehicles. I carpooled with a friend every day, and I couldn’t contact him because even the internal phones were tied up. Cellphones were not allowed in the building, so I couldn’t contact him like that either. I just had to go and hope he would meet me at my car. I rolled out the front doors with the crowds but was amazed that as I left there were men and women heading into the building to do their mission at finding information and updating the President with what was happening. Their safety was secondary to the mission. I got to the garage, and my friend was waiting for me. We jumped in and then had to slowly make our way out of the now congested garage exits. We both were looking out at the sky as much as possible and trying to get the radio to pick up any information. We finally got out into the open air and could hear that another plane had gone down in Pennsylvania. Were there more planes missing? And would they now attack the congested beltway system that surrounds our nation’s capital?

Our drive home was usually filled with conversation, but that day we said nothing as both of us watched the skies and listened to the news station for more information. Our cellphones were useless as the cell towers were overloaded. My wife, Erin, worked for an organization in Alexandria, Virginia, right across the river from the Pentagon, and I couldn’t get hold of her even when I got home. The phone lines would be busy for many hours that day. Erin gratefully got home fairly soon after me, and we sat in silence around the TV for the rest of the day.

When I returned to work, I was amazed again at how politics were forgotten for those first few weeks. The mission was all that was at the forefront of everyone’s workday. Our country was unified like nothing I had seen since the explosion of the Challenger space shuttle — and really not since what I had heard about America during World War II after Pearl Harbor. Unfortunately politics and the media always come back to play, but I hope this day is never forgotten for those people lost that day. I hope that their families are never forgotten when they suddenly had loved ones ripped from them. I hope true heroes are never forgotten that sacrificed their lives in Pennsylvania to spare other Americans. I hope this day is never forgotten for the unity that this great nation can have in good and bad times. Never forget 9/11.

Tim Cox, graphic designer

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Self-portrait

Self-portrait

During the school year, I have the opportunity to teach photography for the communication department. The major assignment I give to the students is based on the work of a photographer named Vivian Maier. Maier was a nanny in Chicago, and she spent much of her free time photographing the things she encountered in everyday life. Maier never shared her work and was undiscovered as a great photographer until after her death in 2009. My students have to turn in 600 photos during the course of the semester, and they learn that interesting things are happening on campus like they were in Chicago in the 1950s if they only pay attention to what’s going on around them. I do this homework assignment along with the students, and I set a goal for myself of 1200 photos during the semester. As the University photographer, I am constantly out capturing the life of the campus so it really is not hard for me to do the project. I started with a self-portrait because Vivian Maier took a bunch of self-portraits. I hope you enjoy this small sample of the 151 photos I have taken so far this semester.

 

The first chapel of the semester

The first chapel of the semester

Andrew and Jenna Montgomery ( nephew and daughter)

Andrew and Jenna Montgomery (nephew and daughter)

Jeff Cavitt

Jeff Cavitt

Nursing transition ceremony

Nursing transition ceremony

Rainy morning

Rainy morning

COBA faculty group

COBA faculty group

Class change

Class change

Dr. McLarty's ice bucket challenge

Dr. McLarty’s ice bucket challenge

Visiting

Visiting

Posing

Posing

Golf action shots

Golf action

COBA open house

COBA open house

Art department watermelon social

Art department watermelon social

Skateboarding

Skateboarding

Academy football

Academy football

Walking to chapel

Walking to chapel

Missions computer lab

Missions computer lab

Dr Thompson's preaching class

Dr Thompson’s preaching class

Chapel exodus

Chapel exodus

Front lawn

Front lawn

Jeff Montgomery/photographer

CampusI recently attended a meeting with iFactory (the creative team we’re working with to build the new website) and was able to see some first snapshots of the art direction for the site.

This is an exciting part of the redesign because we all want to see what the final product will actually look like. The team presented 10 examples that we were able to review to determine pieces that best fit the “look and feel” of Harding and really capture the mood, tone, etc. that we want to convey.

You may be thinking, “Okay, I can see how that’s important,” or you may be thinking, “So? It’s just a website. Pick a font, and a color, and let’s get this thing rolling.” In some ways, I was more in tune with the latter mostly because I’m excited for the end result and sometimes get impatient. But after all the meetings I’ve had with iFactory, IS&T, and departments around campus, I’m realizing the importance of getting the “look and feel” of Harding and other details on the website just right.

Some have said that it only takes a student stepping foot on campus for the first time for them to fall in love with Harding. This statement sounds pretty bold, but I know from personal experience it can be true. I was a first-generation Harding student, meaning I didn’t have a long legacy of family who came to Harding before me; I was the first to attend.

I, like so many others, originally had no interest in Harding — it was far from home and I knew nothing about the school and especially Searcy. But fortunately, a friend was planning to visit campus for Summer Experience (now called Summer Stampede), and I was able to hitch a ride and come see what this place is really all about.

When you visit campus, you really get to experience a snapshot of Harding; you get to experience the “look and feel” of what your life would be like here. While a campus visit for a prospective student is ideal, it’s not always possible. Instead, students occasionally must rely on their interactions with their admissions counselors, what their friends have said about Harding, and, as it is 2014, the University’s website.

So even though I still catch myself getting impatient in the design process and the time it takes to get everything as close to perfection as possible, it helps me to evaluate the “look and feel” of Harding and remember why it matters.

Harding can be a life-changing experience, and it has been for many who have come and gone. When I think about all the work put forth for “just a website” and all the time and effort it takes to get all the details just right, I remember the part that it plays in bringing students to our incredible campus.

So keep an eye on the horizon for the future harding.edu, and please be patient as we work to capture Harding in every detail as best we can. It has been a process and a learning experience for everyone involved in this project, but one of the most important things I’ve come to understand is that it’s not about me, and it’s not about you  — it’s about them. It’s about our students and what we can do as a University to teach, encourage and inspire them, so that they in turn will do that for others. That’s the “look and feel” of Harding — it’s our community of mission. Fortunately I’m not one of the designers, because I have no idea how any of this would translate into a font or a color. I just know I’m excited to be working alongside those who do, and ultimately to be a part of a team working on a new way to tell our story and show our future students why it’s great to be at Harding.

 Bethany Aspey, web content manager

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The third week of the fall semester has officially begun, and it’s a great feeling because this time of year is my favorite. New students are getting to know campus, returning students are reconnecting with friends and meeting new ones, and everyone is trying to find their place here.

The University announced another record undergraduate enrollment this year, which is 4,492, a 1.4 percent increase from last year. This year, students come from 49 states and 44 foreign nations. Harding continues to be an environment in which many students desire to learn and grow. It gives me great joy to know that past, present and future Harding students will forever be connected by unforgettable experiences this university has to offer.

Instagram just came out with a new app called Hyperlapse. I took this video using the app, and I realized how much it represents my time here. My life as a student went by so quickly, but the memories I made are precious, and I will treasure for life the people I was blessed to meet at Harding. Students, take advantage of every opportunity to learn and grow. Your time here will go by in a flash.

Hannah Owens, director of news services

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